What We Do

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Speech

Speech or the pronunciation of sounds can be a concern to parents of young children. There is a pattern to a child’s sound development. Development allows a child’s speech to become clearer gradually, as they learn new sounds. 

 

From 0-3 years, children should be able to say:

• Lip sounds – p, b, m, w

• Tongue tip sounds – t, d, n

• Back of the mouth sounds – k, g

• Other sounds – h, y

By 4 ½ years, children should be able to say:

• Tongue tip sounds – s, z

• Other sounds – sh sh  l, j, f

Most children can be understood most of the time by this age. Songs, rhymes, play, books, talking and listening to other children all help them to sort out word and sound patterns.

By 8 ½ years, children should be able to say:

• All of the sounds clearly

• The last sounds to develop are – v, th, r

 

Some children take extra time to blend sounds together, for example the cl in  climb or sp in spot.

 

If children continue to make sound errors beyond what is expected for their age, they may have a delay or disorder in their sound development. A speech sound delay or disorder may include unclear speech, distorted sounds or the substitution of one sound for another.

This information was provided by Speech Pathology Australia. for more information, go to www.speechpathologyaustralia.org.au

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Language

Understanding

Receptive language is the understanding of spoken or written language. A child may present with receptive language difficulties if they experience:

  • Difficulty following instructions

  • Difficulty responding to and answering questions

  • Difficulties listening and responding at home or preschool

  • Behaviour or attending problems

  • Frustration when communicating with others.

 

Talking

Expressive language means talking or verbal communication. This is the ability to form sentences using correct grammar and vocabulary. Expressive language difficulties can affect the ability to communicate their message using spoken or written language.

An individual with an expressive language disorder may have:

  • Difficulty in combining words to form a meaningful sentences

  • Difficulty in retrieving the right word in conversation

  • Difficulties in using the correct grammar

  • A tendency to use jargon (made up words) in their sentences

  • Difficulty holding a conversation or retelling a story

  • Difficulty writing a story or report

This information was provided by Speech Pathology Australia. for more information, go to www.speechpathologyaustralia.org.au

 
 
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Stuttering

Stuttering is a disorder of speech fluency. Although stuttering in some young children may resolve naturally, it is important to seek advice as early as possible. A stutter that goes untreated may become more difficult to correct as a child matures.

Common features of stuttering include:

  • Repetition of a sound,syllable, word, phrase or sentence

  • Prolongations or the lengthening of a sound in a word

  • Blocks or an interruption to the airflow so that no sound is produced.

 

There may be additional features that occur at the same time as the stutter such as tension in their facial features or tics.

This information was provided by Speech Pathology Australia. for more information, go to www.speechpathologyaustralia.org.au

 
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Literacy

Literacy difficulties are experienced by children who might struggle to make progress at school with pre-reading skill (phonemic awareness), reading, writing and/or spelling. 

 

Assessment determines if there are difficulties in the following areas:

  • Phonemic awareness skills (the ability to identify, segment, delete and blend sounds in words)

  • Identify and create rhyming words

  • Blend a string of sounds together to make a word

  • Separate individual sounds from words

  • Decode sounds in words for reading

  • Relate the sound to a letter shape and write it

  • Understand the meaning of individual words

  • Remembering a string of words and understand their meaning within a sentence

  • Relate different sentences to each other.

  • Writing sentences or paragraphs

  • Writing essays

This information was provided by Speech Pathology Australia. for more information, go to www.speechpathologyaustralia.org.au

 
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Voice

Children or adults may have a voice problem when they experience:  

  • A voice with hoarse, husky, croaky, strained, or shaky quality

  • A voice with reduced volume

  • Pitch that is too high or too low 

  • A voice with a hoarse, croaky, strained or husky quality 

  • A tired voice after talking

  • Effortful voice use

  • An uncomfortable or sore throat during and/or after talking 

  • A need to cough or clear the throat during and/or after talking 

 

Any of these symptoms can happen when the vocal folds (vocal cords) in the larynx (voice box) are not working effectively. Speech pathology intervention aims to improve voice use and enhance vocal quality.

 

This information was provided by Speech Pathology Australia. for more information, go to www.speechpathologyaustralia.org.au

 
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Autism Spectrum Disorder

Autism is a lifelong development condition characterised by difficulties in communication, social interaction, restricted and repetitive interests and behaviours, and sensory sensitivities.

 

Social Communication (or Pragmatic Language) refers to a child’s ability to understand and use language in social contexts.

 

Pragmatic language includes body language, voice tone, facial expressions, humour and conversational ‘rules’. Many children with autism spectrum disorder have difficulty understanding these social cues, rules and language.

 

Speech pathologists develop social communication skills of children and adults, There may be a need to consult with other professionals such as pediatricians, psychologists, teachers, occupational therapists and general practitioners.

This information was provided by Speech Pathology Australia. for more information, go to www.speechpathologyaustralia.org.au

 

Make An Enquiry

Contact Us

If you have any questions about our services or would like to organise a more in-depth discussion about your goals, please get in touch:

Call: 0417 099 233

Email: cathy@beecroftspeech.com.au

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